Taking place in Chicago on July 24:

7PM – Program One – Probably Suitable for All Ages – 47 min.
Robert Breer’s Rubber Cement (1975, 10 min.) is a color photocopy film that contains an affectionate homage to Felix the Cat. Jonathan Rosenbaum called Breer “the key figure in avant-garde animation.”
Pola Chapelle’s Fishes in Screaming Water (1969, 6 min.), created for the very first cat film festival INTERCAT ’69, features Georgecat, the accommodating feline who starred in How to Draw a Cat, in a performance that Jonas Mekas said “continues the great tradition of acting established by Rin Tin Tin.”
Ken Jacobs’s Airshaft (1967, 4 min.) is a single shot from a fixed camera from within a darkened room, out a fire-escape door, and into the airshaft between buildings, and there’s a cat in there somewhere.
Roberta Cantow’s If This Ain’t Heaven (1984, 27 min.) is a moving, tender documentary about the relationship between a middle-aged press operator and his constant companion, a cat named Africa.
8PM – Program 2 – Definitely Not Suitable for Kids – 39 min.
Caroline Koebel’s Puss! The Booted Cat (1995, 13 min.) is an erotic short about the various incarnations of the classic fairytale, but transformed here into a contemporary adventure of unrequited love and feline feminine power. 

Carolee Schneemann’s Fuses (1967, 23 min.) is, according to B. Ruby Rich, “devastatingly erotic, transcending the surfaces of sex to communicate its true spirit, its meaning as an activity for herself and, quite accurately, women in general.”
When: Thursday, July 24 at 7PMWhere: Co-Prosperity Sphere, 3219 S. Morgan StreetHow Much: $7 admission (this program is costing us a lot to put together!)

Taking place in Chicago on July 24:

7PM – Program One – Probably Suitable for All Ages – 47 min.

  • Robert Breer’s Rubber Cement (1975, 10 min.) is a color photocopy film that contains an affectionate homage to Felix the Cat. Jonathan Rosenbaum called Breer “the key figure in avant-garde animation.”
  • Pola Chapelle’s Fishes in Screaming Water (1969, 6 min.), created for the very first cat film festival INTERCAT ’69, features Georgecat, the accommodating feline who starred in How to Draw a Cat, in a performance that Jonas Mekas said “continues the great tradition of acting established by Rin Tin Tin.”
  • Ken Jacobs’s Airshaft (1967, 4 min.) is a single shot from a fixed camera from within a darkened room, out a fire-escape door, and into the airshaft between buildings, and there’s a cat in there somewhere.
  • Roberta Cantow’s If This Ain’t Heaven (1984, 27 min.) is a moving, tender documentary about the relationship between a middle-aged press operator and his constant companion, a cat named Africa.

8PM – Program 2 – Definitely Not Suitable for Kids – 39 min.

  • Caroline Koebel’s Puss! The Booted Cat (1995, 13 min.) is an erotic short about the various incarnations of the classic fairytale, but transformed here into a contemporary adventure of unrequited love and feline feminine power. 

  • Carolee Schneemann’s Fuses (1967, 23 min.) is, according to B. Ruby Rich, “devastatingly erotic, transcending the surfaces of sex to communicate its true spirit, its meaning as an activity for herself and, quite accurately, women in general.”

When: Thursday, July 24 at 7PM
Where: Co-Prosperity Sphere, 3219 S. Morgan Street
How Much: $7 admission (this program is costing us a lot to put together!)

Francis Lawrence, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013)

Why every Hollywood film with a budget over $25,000 needs to be 140 minutes these days, I know not. Also, get off my lawn. 

So there’s a little bit of that icky compulsory-fun aspect that permeates the contemporary blockbuster lurking around the edges of this. However, there are also TWICE AS MANY CAT SCENES as the first one’s single cat cutaway. And it’s still, y’know, empowering-ish. Plus, JLaw. 

David Starr Jordan, “The Sympsychograph: A Study in Impressionist Physics" (1896):

From the members of the Camera Club, seven of those having greatest animal magnetism and greatest power of mental concentration were chosen for the experiment. Connection was made from the eye of these observers to the corresponding parts of the lens; then all were to remain in utter darkness and perfect silence, each person fixing his mind on a cat. They were not to think of any particular cat, but of a cat as represented by the innate idea of the mind or ego itself. This was highly important, for the purpose of Mr. Marvin was not simply to fix by photography an ephemeral recollection, as Mr. Rogers and Mr. Lee had done ; it was to bring out the impression of ultimate feline reality. The innate image in the mind was the object desired. One man’s thought of a cat would be individual, ephemeral, a recollection of some cat which he had some time seen, and which by the mind’s eye would be seen again. From seven ideals, sympathetically combined, the true cat would be developed. This is the essence of sympsychography, a term suggested by Prof. Amos Gridley, of Alcalde, as distinct from the ordinary ideography of Rogers and Lee. The personal equation would be measurably eliminated in sympsychography, while the cat of the human innate idea, the astral cat, the cat which “never was on sea or land,” but in accordance with which all cats have been brought into incarnation, would be more or less perfectly disclosed. […]
It will be noticed that this picture is unmistakably one of a cat. But it is a cat in its real essence, the type cat as distinguished from human impressions of individual cats. This achievement, like the earlier ones of Odin, Röntgen, Rogers, and Lee, opens great vistas for future scientific research. The next experiment will be by similar means to photograph the cat’s idea of man.

David Starr Jordan, “The Sympsychograph: A Study in Impressionist Physics" (1896):

From the members of the Camera Club, seven of those having greatest animal magnetism and greatest power of mental concentration were chosen for the experiment. Connection was made from the eye of these observers to the corresponding parts of the lens; then all were to remain in utter darkness and perfect silence, each person fixing his mind on a cat. They were not to think of any particular cat, but of a cat as represented by the innate idea of the mind or ego itself. This was highly important, for the purpose of Mr. Marvin was not simply to fix by photography an ephemeral recollection, as Mr. Rogers and Mr. Lee had done ; it was to bring out the impression of ultimate feline reality. The innate image in the mind was the object desired. One man’s thought of a cat would be individual, ephemeral, a recollection of some cat which he had some time seen, and which by the mind’s eye would be seen again. From seven ideals, sympathetically combined, the true cat would be developed. This is the essence of sympsychography, a term suggested by Prof. Amos Gridley, of Alcalde, as distinct from the ordinary ideography of Rogers and Lee. The personal equation would be measurably eliminated in sympsychography, while the cat of the human innate idea, the astral cat, the cat which “never was on sea or land,” but in accordance with which all cats have been brought into incarnation, would be more or less perfectly disclosed. […]

It will be noticed that this picture is unmistakably one of a cat. But it is a cat in its real essence, the type cat as distinguished from human impressions of individual cats. This achievement, like the earlier ones of Odin, Röntgen, Rogers, and Lee, opens great vistas for future scientific research. The next experiment will be by similar means to photograph the cat’s idea of man.