Review of Paul Terry’s Scrambled Eggs (1926) from Film Daily (August 22, 1926), p. 11.
(N.B. The plot of this [most likely lost] animated cartoon bears a, ahem, striking resemblance to Walt Disney’s infamous Alice’s Egg Plant of the previous year. Minus, of course, the strike.) (See also: Frank Tashlin’s Swooner Crooner [1944].)

Review of Paul Terry’s Scrambled Eggs (1926) from Film Daily (August 22, 1926), p. 11.

(N.B. The plot of this [most likely lost] animated cartoon bears a, ahem, striking resemblance to Walt Disney’s infamous Alice’s Egg Plant of the previous year. Minus, of course, the strike.) (See also: Frank Tashlin’s Swooner Crooner [1944].)

Debra Geissel, Big Black’s Last Blast (1987)

It’s a free country, so you’re free to like Steve Albini. We don’t know why you’d do such a thing, though. I guess that Bush song “Swallow” was okay. And we hear he’s an okay food blogger. Whatever. “Rapeman,” yeah, really transgressive, d00d. You should totes collab with Nick Zedd and Terry Richardson, that would be so badass. And maybe Hank Rollins too, let the testosterone flow. But anyway. 

coeursfideles
altshippingforecast:

When Sight and Sound asked for a photo of Chris Marker for Richard Roud’s profile of “The Left Bank” filmmakers in the Winter 1962-63 issue, he sent them this.
The caption reads: “ABOVE: Portrait of the director as a young cat. Marker replies to all requests for photographs of himself by sending pictures of cats; this one was taken by Resnais.”
(Copyright Sight and Sound, obviously. Sure, I have a paper copy of the Winter 1962-63 issue, but why not subscribe to their digital archive to discover more stuff like this).

altshippingforecast:

When Sight and Sound asked for a photo of Chris Marker for Richard Roud’s profile of “The Left Bank” filmmakers in the Winter 1962-63 issue, he sent them this.

The caption reads: “ABOVE: Portrait of the director as a young cat. Marker replies to all requests for photographs of himself by sending pictures of cats; this one was taken by Resnais.”


(Copyright Sight and Sound, obviously. Sure, I have a paper copy of the Winter 1962-63 issue, but why not subscribe to their digital archive to discover more stuff like this).